Birmingham Adult Dyslexic Group

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What is Dyslexia?

Dyslexia is a state of disorientation where the brain's two hemispheres are not communicating with each other. It is a different way of thinking and a different way of learning. Researchers now believe that dyslexia occurs because of the way that the brain is formed and the way it processes the information it receives. Pictures of the brain, taken using modern imaging tools, have shown that when people with dyslexia read they use different parts of the brain to non-dyslexics. People with dyslexia process information in the right hemisphere of the brain, this is not the side of the brain that focuses on language work, and, as a result, the brains of dyslexic children and adults have to work an estimated six times harder.

People with dyslexia may struggle with many different aspects of everyday life because of short-term memory loss. For instance this could be putting things in order, following instructions and differentiating between left and right. When a dyslexic person is under pressure or stressed the effects of short-term memory loss are intensified even more.

Someone who has dyslexic traits may have developed sophisticated strategies that help them get through everyday life and protect them from embarrassment. For example, when asked to complete an application form they will ask to take the form home to fill in because they cannot remember the required information.

The above information has been researched by and is the interpretation of Stephen Duffy.

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